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August 19 2018

14:00

Landscapes of the World

Adventure seeker Daniel Kordan has no dilemma. With a loving wife and daughter at home, his photography workshops all around the globe, and a whole Earth waiting to be explored and photographed, he somehow manages to balance it all.

There was a battle for Daniel’s interest between nature photography and science, a point when university and a quantum physics thesis, combined with family and friends, all became overwhelming. Photography didn’t seem a priority, but in the end, it prevailed. As a mountain and climbing guide at his university mountain club, Daniel hiked and traveled a lot, meeting sunrises above the clouds. “It’s hard not to start sharing the beauty with others in such conditions.”

Namibia

He was also the chief editor at a print magazine called “Continent Expedition” which was forced to shut down due to the rise of social networks. “Our sales dropped significantly. We wrote about people and travel challenging National Geographic,” he said. A combination of like life experiences was what sparked his passion for landscape photography.

Patagonia

“I never thought that photography could be my work or profession. I appreciated my scientific work, and photography was always a passion. But I always found pleasure in pathless woods: places I returned to and always admired. Nature became my inspiration, with all its beauty, variety of colors and compositions.”

Daniel is a full-time photographer and a guide on his very own photo tours, but this didn’t come easy:

“Creating a landscape portfolio takes years and years, you cannot just jump out. It is hard work and first steps you receive no feedback. There are no companies or people who you can work for in this field. You work for yourself. It took me around seven or eight years of my career just to form my skills and portfolio. Only after that time did it started to work for me with licenses, print requests and plenty of returning customers in my tours.”

Namibia

Daniel has an incredibly respectful perspective on the purpose of human existence. “Our planet was given to us to explore it. We are here not to produce money for money, but we are here to feel, listen and explore our beautiful world. When I first saw rays of sun, beautiful colors in the sky, they inspired me to move forward. These are simple things that drive me: sunsets and sunrises, walking in the mountains, sounds of waterfalls and singing of birds. I just feel happy in harmony with nature and even happier sharing it with others, inspiring them to travel and feel the same. My greatest goal? The feeling of freedom.”

Greenland

If he could give his younger self any piece of advice, it would be to firstly work with the foreground. “Sometimes treasures lay beneath your feet: ice shards, beautiful snow textures, or sand patterns. Use foreground to transport the viewer inside the frame. A well-chosen foreground can create a completely different photo even in a well-known location.” Secondly, don’t be afraid to use complicated techniques for photos. “You can use focus stacking and make all the details of your composition extremely sharp. Focus stacking and vertical panoramas, for example, will allow you to use flowers/ice patterns as foreground elements. A wide angle lens (14 mm on full frame) is very useful, as it allows you to have fewer frames for your stack. The short hyperfocal distance allows you to be very close to the foreground.”

Antarctica

Daniel has a very long list of places to go, especially in Russia, but he spends most of his time split between Norway at the Lofoten islands and in Tuscany, guiding groups from Europe, UK, US, Asia, and Russia. He currently has an ongoing yachting expedition project called “Two poles” from “Saint-Petersburg to Antarctica through Svalbard and Greenland, along with one-week workshops.” His favorite places are Greenland, Kamchatka, Patagonia, and Tuscany because of the calming tours, great discussions, and fantastic food.

Camargue

When asked what his biggest fear of being a photographer is, he responded: “I have no fears so far. Of course, I fear to be frozen to death, eaten by a bear or sometimes local tribes, but they all may be much better than dying in an office.” So… that’s something to think about. If you’re interested in more check out his Flickr, and if you want a workshop, or a 15-hour online landscape photography course, check out his website.

August 09 2018

00:00

#StillFlickring: How a group of photographers look back to move forward

They created the hashtag #StillFlickring and the challenge: Every two weeks, each participant browses through the old images of the photographer they are challenging within the group and selects a photo for the photographer to recreate. There are ten rounds total so everyone is challenged at least once.

We chatted with the creator of the project, Liisa H. Hole, and with participating photographer and current Adobe Creative Resident, Laura Zalenga, to learn more about the backstory behind this fantastic idea.

Untitled

How the idea for the project came to be

Liisa: I came up with the idea for this project back in January. I was drowning in a massive study load and was in the middle of one of my most stressful exam sessions so far, and felt this sudden urge to look at my old work on Flickr. When going through my old photos, multiple things became very clear to me: 1) The artistic community on Flickr was so kind and supportive, and it’s sad how this sort of authenticity and generosity had vanished from social media 2) I really missed taking self-portraits and being more creative in my approach to photography; I felt a sense of wanting to return to my roots 3) I would do so many of my old concepts differently now, and definitely much better on the technical level 4) I realized that I probably wasn’t the only one feeling like this.

lean on me

The importance of Flickr

Liisa: Some of my very best memories were from the good old Flickr days. For example, back in 2012, I flew to the States to meet up with a bunch of complete strangers whose work I had followed on Flickr, and it ended up being the best thing ever. Those few days at the Midwest Flickr gathering were filled with so much passion, inspiration, creativity, and laughter. We went on little to no sleep, took so many photos and formed such strong bonds throughout it all. Later that year another person from Flickr came into my life – a weekend that was supposed to be a photography meetup led to falling in love instead, and now that person is my husband. It’s crazy, right?! I’m so thankful for joining Flickr about a decade ago, and for everything it’s brought into my life.

Laura: The whole community was very different on Flickr compared to now where everyone is mostly posting on Instagram, and no one ever gives you real feedback. On Flickr, people were giving you constructive criticism, and it was a lot more personal. It didn’t matter that much how many likes a picture would get, so it was a very different world, and I think we were all nostalgic and really missed that cool era of our photography.

To grow

Recreating their old self-portraits for this project

Liisa: I feel like we often don’t give ourselves enough credit for how much we’ve actually evolved over the years – or maybe we don’t even notice it –, so this has been an amazing opportunity to see clear growth and acknowledge our entire artistic journey. For me personally it’s become crystal clear that while I’m terribly out of practice when it comes to self-portraits, I’ve definitely learned something in the past six years, despite the complicated, on-off relationship I’ve had with photography. I also tend to be very self-critical, but this project has allowed me to soften up a bit and cherish the current ‘me’ instead of feeling like the best was in the past. I’m not the same person who I was back then, but it’s a good thing. Different is anything but bad.

Laura: I know that technically I got so much better, and you’d think that I’d be able to recreate the images and that they would just look better, but I realized that it is not possible to do that, because you cannot mimic the mood or the intention that you had when you first took that photo. From the start, I knew that I would rather try and be inspired by the [old] photo or have the same theme, or see how the same topic now relates differently to me… It’s a nice challenge–looking back and seeing how much you’ve changed personally and photography wise.

Untitled

Evolution of their work

Liisa: I feel like my photographic journey has been a rollercoaster ride. It’s been very reflective of the stages in my life. For example, I consider my photos from November 2012 to be one of my very best, to this day. I was madly in love and liked using blue tones and creating dreamy atmospheres. In 2014 I had to cut my hair short, and while it’s not really the biggest issue in the world, it challenged my self-image a lot. I felt like I wasn’t pretty and feminine enough to be in photos (at least not in the way I used to be), so I had to redefine my style a bit – I started experimenting with body paint and strong colors, and cared a lot less about looking pretty. Now I’ve got to a phase in my life where I’m stronger than ever, both physically and mentally, so I’m trying to convey that through my body language. I’ve always found the human body very inspiring and beautiful, but I never really dared to capture my own. Now that I feel content in my body and accept it with all its flaws, it’s empowering to use it as a tool in my work.

Laura: Style-wise, I still do self-portraits. While some of the others in the group started with self-portraits and then moved on to take photos of other people, I stuck to that topic, and it worked out in the end. I do a lot of talks about self-portraiture and how self-portraits are a very different thing from selfies. People seem to still be interested in the topic, especially in a time where everyone cares about themselves but never spends quality time alone. Self-portraiture is almost like meditation, but not many people see that.

Dwarfed by Giant

How they met the other photographers that are part of this project

Liisa: All of us kind of “met” on Flickr, and not all of us have met up in the real world. I’ve only met Ethan, Savannah and Håvard. Savannah has met Brittany, Ethan and me; Alex and Christian have met up with Brittany; Laura has met Ethan; Jana hasn’t met anyone (yet!).

Laura: We once had a meetup with people from over the world on Vancouver Island. I’d say we were fifty people, and we called it the Flickr island, and it was probably the biggest non-official but people-organized Flickr meetup. That was in 2014, and to me, that was a life-changing experience because it gave me so much inspiration. Funnily, I haven’t met most of the people who are part of the project in real life.

Light as a Feather

Check out the photos uploaded to Flickr so far and be sure to follow these ten young photographers for more beautiful work and inspiration!

Alex Benetel
Christian Benetel
Ethan Coverstone
Savannah Daras
Sophie Eggert
Liisa Harmson-Hole
Håvard Hole
Brittany Juravich
Jana Stormanns
Laura Zalenga

Grounded

August 07 2018

01:06

Flickr Heroes of the Week

This week our two cover photos on our Flickr social media channels are: ‘Dancing Alone’ by Robert Elia on Tumblr and Twitter & ‘Play misty for me’ by wildwalker3 on Facebook and Google+.

Dancing Alone. Play misty for me

Interested in having your photo featured as a cover image on our social media pages? Join the Flickr Heroes group!

The Honorable Mentions for the week are below:

The Wild Wind Puffin DSC_4200.jpgs

If you want your photo to be considered for next week, submit your best images to the Flickr Heroes group pool by Monday morning. Hint: we’re not big fans of watermarks. Winners are announced in the Flickr Heroes Group, on the blog, and across our social media accounts. Check them out before they change next Monday!

Flickr on Facebook

Flickr on Twitter

Flickr on Tumblr

Flickr on Instagram

Flickr on Google+

August 01 2018

19:55

Beauty in Otherness

Andres Marti studied fine arts and design at the Pontificia Universidad in Bogota, Colombia. Six years ago, he co-founded the art brand Comes Cake and design studio Whatever Works allowing him to work within various realms of art including advertising, design, fashion, music, and photography. His work within the field of photography has caught quite a lot of attention due to its ironic uniqueness. Andres uses a mix of different techniques to acquire the desired result which is often “difficult to put a label on”. The photo below is a great example, but also one of his personal favorites.

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The entirety of the piece looks as if it was painted, but in fact, the model is human. Andrew shot this image in Santiago de Chile in an abandoned pool. The model happens to be photographer Christian Corocca, an underground DJ that Andres met through Flickr. This type of composition does not come easy, and during a typical week, it takes 2 hours of shooting and 8 hours of editing at the computer. Essentially, it’s a collage composed of post-production makeup, natural and artificial light, real and digital elements. Andres says “I seek to immerse the character in a timeless universe that plays between reality and fiction.”

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His latest personal photography project is titled “Otredad” or “Otherness.” It’s the expression of himself through a portrait series of individuals he met on the street, of friends and acquaintances. The one thing each portrait has in common is the coloring of their noses and eyelids in a ruby red, similar to Rembrandt paintings, “physically expressing vulnerability of these beings,” but also a vulnerability in himself.

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Andres described his project title in depth as he said: “I named them that way because the idea of otherness serves to keep in mind that we live in collective society and we are part of a complex whole. In the concept of ‘otherness,’ we can appreciate a certain personal unfolding. It shows us that identity goes beyond us. It is me and the other, at the same time.”

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Although his work may be pinned as abstract, he believes it’s much more. Because he feeds on art to create these images, his work is a mix of “baroque, renaissance, pop art and things that I see in my life. From there I take out elements such as colors, textures, forms, rhythms, compositions, to create the image.” When explaining the intention behind their composition, he says: “It is a cathartic process, that through the image and all the elements that make it up—the model, the light, the colors, the expression, the composition, the look—, I can transmit the feeling that invades my mind into something I can express.”

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If you’re interested in seeing more of his work, check out his Flickr account! A book with the first season of Otredad is available for purchase through his Instagram @6marti6. Currently, Andres is preparing for his first solo exhibition which will premiere at the end of 2018.

July 31 2018

00:22

Flickr Heroes of the Week

This week our two cover photos on our Flickr social media channels are: ‘Diversion II’ by David Hopley on Tumblr and Twitter & ‘Untitled’ by Edge Lee on Facebook and Google+.

Diversion II 20180716-DSC05816

Interested in having your photo featured as a cover image on our social media pages? Join the Flickr Heroes group!

The Honorable Mentions for the week are below:

河北赤城 冰山梁 银河 Assembly of Trees Wheat Untitled

If you want your photo to be considered for next week, submit your best images to the Flickr Heroes group pool by Monday morning. Hint: we’re not big fans of watermarks. Winners are announced in the Flickr Heroes Group, on the blog, and across our social media accounts. Check them out before they change next Monday!

Flickr on Facebook

Flickr on Twitter

Flickr on Tumblr

Flickr on Instagram

Flickr on Google+

July 23 2018

22:22

Flickr Heroes of the Week

This week our two cover photos on our Flickr social media channels are: ‘Larung Gar, Tibetan Buddhist city in Sichuan, China’ by Valerian Guillot on Tumblr and Twitter & ‘My Blue eye’ by David Segovia on Facebook and Google+.

Larung Gar, Tibetan Buddhist city in Sichuan, China My Blue eye

Interested in having your photo featured as a cover image on our social media pages? Join the Flickr Heroes group!

The Honorable Mentions for the week are below:

Tree Alone IMGP0114_easyHDR Anse-à-la-Cabane - Lighthouse

If you want your photo to be considered for next week, submit your best images to the Flickr Heroes group pool by Monday morning. Hint: we’re not big fans of watermarks. Winners are announced in the Flickr Heroes Group, on the blog, and across our social media accounts. Check them out before they change next Monday!

Flickr on Facebook

Flickr on Twitter

Flickr on Tumblr

Flickr on Instagram

Flickr on Google+

July 19 2018

17:42

Photography in a Swamp

Self-taught nature photographer David Frutos dwells in Murcia, Southeast Spain, and captures the incredible essence of the Mediterranean coast like a mystical dream.

David lives less than 75 kilometers from one of the best places he’s ever been—the Camarillas Swamp in Albacete, Spain. Many of the photos for which he won prestigious international awards have come from this particular location that he has managed to turn into a beautiful, magical spot.

The Swamp Star

He remembers being very young when his interest in photography first piqued as a friend of the family also had a passion for the subject. David never actually pursued that passion until college, when he made his reels for black and white photographs and created a home studio. Up until that point, his only exposure to the camera was delving through as many photography books as possible, trying to expose himself to different types of images. Now as an accomplished photographer, David uses a Canon 5D Mark IV, and the vast majority of his photos are created with a wide-angle Canon 17-40mm.

By continuously photographing the environment around him, he has realized the importance of preservation. Maintaining his environmental surroundings for the generations to come has become incredibly important to him, and he hopes his photography helps spread this message, as the world may not always look as beautiful!

Hexagonal The Fallen Idol V

In the image above, one of David’s favorites, he describes the setting through the lens of an artist: “The most important thing is rhythm, a rhythm provided by the trees aligned and repeated towards a vanishing point that directs the gaze of the spectator to the protagonist of the scene, a fallen poplar that I have called The Fallen Idol.” It is the first in a series of five images.

The rest of the elements enter the pictorial movement with dyes of romanticism, the atmosphere in the form of fog, the rest of poplars dressed in beautiful colors of autumn as if they want to honor the death of their brother. Finally, we add the beautiful reflections in the water that reinforce the guidelines to direct the view towards the central element in the scene.

The Big Yellow Eye

David’s work revolves around the theory of minimalism. In an interview with him, he revealed that the last thing he would ever do is include a human in his photographs. “I am convinced that the human species is on a path to the destruction of the planet on which we live. Maybe this thought sounds like catastrophe and or something similar to nihilism, but that’s what I believe.”

Daydreaming

On April 19, 2018, a fantastic collection of photography was released with the work of some of the most prestigious nature photographers in Spain, David included. The book can be purchased on Amazon here! It’s currently available only in Spanish. David is also participating in a traveling exhibition in Spain called “PICTIO, En compañía de la pintura” so if you’re in the area, be sure to check it out! To see more of David’s photographs for free, be sure to see his Flickr Photostream!

July 17 2018

00:08

Flickr Heroes of the Week

This week our two cover photos on our Flickr social media channels are: ‘Reine’ by Jose Feito on Tumblr and Twitter & ‘Young Photographer’ by Karl.T – Photographie on Facebook and Google+.

Reine young photographer

Interested in having your photo featured as a cover image on our social media pages? Join the Flickr Heroes group!

The Honorable Mentions for the week are below:

Canada Day Celebration in Vancouver City one magical Day Star Bow (The Milky Way)

If you want your photo to be considered for next week, submit your best images to the Flickr Heroes group pool by Monday morning. Hint: we’re not big fans of watermarks. Winners are announced in the Flickr Heroes Group, on the blog, and across our social media accounts. Check them out before they change next Monday!

Flickr on Facebook

Flickr on Twitter

Flickr on Tumblr

Flickr on Instagram

Flickr on Google+

July 09 2018

18:35

Flickr Heroes of the Week

This week our two cover photos on our Flickr social media channels are: ‘Mono Lake, Yosemite’ by Oliverpan on Tumblr and Twitter & ‘…backstreets..’ by *ines_maria on Facebook and Google+.

MONO LAKE, YOSEMITE ...backstreets..

Interested in having your photo featured as a cover image on our social media pages? Join the Flickr Heroes group!

The Honorable Mentions for the week are below:

Summer light Little Owl On Alert DSC_9144

If you want your photo to be considered for next week, submit your best images to the Flickr Heroes group pool by Monday morning. Winners are announced in the Flickr Heroes Group, on the blog, and across our social media accounts. Check them out before they change next Monday!

Flickr on Facebook

Flickr on Twitter

Flickr on Tumblr

Flickr on Instagram

Flickr on Google+

June 28 2018

20:22

Shooting Butterflies — Markus Becker

There was a time when it was common practice to believe in stereotypes like how women belonged in the kitchen, men should be strong and upstanding, sports were for men, and butterflies were for women. Fortunately, times have changed.

Meet mechanical engineer Markus Becker from Swabian Alb, southwest of Germany, who may be one the best butterfly photographers you’ve encountered on Flickr. Spending approximately four hours shooting and three hours of editing per week, Markus dedicates all the extra time he can to this hobby that’s taking over.

Bläuling. Lycaenidae in sunset.

Every one of Markus’ photographs is shot without a tripod and with natural ambient light, usually low light, which makes each image incredibly unique and difficult to get.

He describes his efforts in capturing the photo below by saying: “I like the structures and the deep blue colors in the bokeh. I shot this one in very late light on a cold day, about one hour after sunset and after a few hours of walking. The weather was so cloudy that I had only shot three photos that whole evening. As the clouds opened up for a few minutes, this light source in combination with the blue clouds created something like a moonlight scene.”

Kurzschwänziger Bläuling

As an engineer, it was his curiosity for technology that led him to photography. The intricacies of the camera fascinated him enough to buy his very own digital camera, a Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ28 and start experimenting with HDR, long exposure and portrait photography. The fact that he is self-taught has made this hobby an ongoing learning process which has only made it more interesting for Markus.

Hornklee-Widderchen.

He only shoots in three locations, all within a 45-minute drive from his home, and all outside of town and within the woods. Because of his passion for shooting, he has become familiar with many wild insects and the importance of environmental conservation. He has also familiarized himself with the list of currently threatened species because within the past few decades there has been an extreme decline in biodiversity. This loss has impacted him, as it is his primary focus for photography. “This motivates me to shoot more and better photos. My goal is to show the distinctiveness and beauty of our very vulnerable natural environment.”

His favorite butterfly is the endangered Parnassius Apollo. To him, it’s the most photogenic. “It symbolizes the critical development of butterflies: one hundred years ago about sixty populations of the Apollo were known in the state I’m living at (Baden- Württemberg). Today only one population is left. It’s threatened with extinction.”

Bläuling im Wiesenbokeh. Melanargia galathea (female)

Markus says he uses macro lenses and shoots macro objects, but his photos don’t fall under the classic definition of macro photography. “I’m not only focusing on one single macro object. I try to depict a macro world. There is a lot of background in my photos, and during my shootings, I’m always on the lookout for the perfect bokeh.” He’s also actively involved in macro, nature and general photography Flickr groups, where he looks for inspiration and advice.

Interested in seeing more photos from Markus’ Lepidoptera collection? Keep an eye on his Flickr profile!

June 26 2018

14:00

Welcome the Amadeo León Collection to the Flickr Commons!

We’re thrilled to welcome the Amadeo León Collection of Boconó Photographs to the Flickr Commons! The Amadeo León Collection is a private effort to digitize about 12,500 film negatives of the people and sights of a small city in the Venezuelan Andes.

CAL13096.JPG

Amadeo León was a photographer in Boconó, Venezuela in the 20th century, and his images are a time capsule of the people, lives, customs, and landscapes of Boconó. Upon his passing, his son, Dr. Alonso León Rocha asked local institutions to store and preserve his father photographic legacy, but the lack of resources, technology, and equipment made it impossible.

CAL05404.JPG

In 2010, a family friend, Pablo Miliani, learned of Dr. León Rocha’s plight and offered to store, digitize, and preserve the collection. By sharing the photographs online through the Collection’s Facebook page and other platforms, Milani opens up the possibility to react on, and learn more about the history of Boconó so other people, including their descendants, have a chance to see the images and contribute information.

CAL07760.JPG CAL07338.JPG CAL00249.JPG

We’ve selected a few of our favorites here, but it’s worth checking out the entire collection on Flickr.

You can also visit the Amadeo León Collection website here, or click on the video below (in Spanish) to learn more.

Amadeo Leon

June 25 2018

20:38

Flickr Heroes of the Week

This week our two cover photos on our Flickr social media channels are: ‘Loch awesine’ by images@twiston on Tumblr and Twitter & ‘Piping Plover’ by RGL_Photography on Facebook and Google+.

Loch awesome Piping Plover | 2018 - 30

Interested in having your photo featured as a cover image on our social media pages? Join the Flickr Heroes group!

The Honorable Mentions for the week are below:

Cape daisy Time Blue wings

If you want your photo to be considered for next week, submit your best images to the Flickr Heroes group pool by Monday morning. Winners are announced in the Flickr Heroes Group, on the blog, and across our social media accounts. Check them out before they change next Monday!

Flickr on Facebook

Flickr on Twitter

Flickr on Tumblr

Flickr on Instagram

Flickr on Google+

May 26 2018

18:35

Happy Sally Ride Day!

You may not be familiar with this holiday, but today we celebrate the first American woman astronaut: Sally Ride. Sally’s favorite subject in school was always math, but she had a keen interest in astronomy and physical science. She was quoted saying “For a long time, society put obstacles in the way of women who wanted to enter the sciences.” Despite these hindrances, she joined NASA in 1978 and became the first American female in space in 1983.

[Sally Ride] America's first woman astronaut communitcates with ground controllers from the flight deck during the six day mission of the Challenger. National Aeronautics and Space Administration., 06/18/1983 - 06/24/1983

“My background is in physics, so I was the mission specialist, who is sort of like the flight engineer on an airplane.”

Her job once she was in space during the STS-7 space shuttle mission, her first mission, was to work the robotic arm of the shuttle. The arm was used to help launch satellites into space.

Sally Ride, First U.S. Woman in Space

Sally Ride retired from Nasa in 1987. She left as the first woman and youngest American in space at just 32 years old. Sally went on to become a physics professor at the University of California, San Diego. She also founded an educational company called Sally Ride Science to help inspire women and minorities to enter and stick with STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math).

Sally K. Ride

Sally was the CEO of Sally Ride Science until she passed on July 23, 2012, after a long struggle with pancreatic cancer. Her passion for the work is not forgotten. Sally said: “Studying whether there’s life on Mars or studying how the universe began, there’s something magical about pushing back the frontiers of knowledge. That’s something that is almost part of being human, and I’m certain that will continue.”

Ride on the Middeck

If you think that this whole astronaut thing sounds pretty sweet, here are a few quotes from Sally herself.

For whatever reason, I didn’t succumb to the stereotype that science wasn’t for girls. I got encouragement from my parents. I never ran into a teacher or a counselor who told me that science was for boys. A lot of my friends did.

The world and our perceptions have changed a lot, even since the ’70s, but there are lingering stereotypes. If you ask an 11-year-old to draw a scientist, she’s likely to draw a geeky guy with a pocket protector. That’s just not an image an 11-year-old girl aspires to.

When you’re getting ready to launch into space, you’re sitting on a big explosion just waiting to happen.

On the view from space:

The stars don’t look bigger, but they do look brighter.

STS-7 Crew
00:38

Flickr Friday – Sign of the Times

This was definitely an interesting challenge. We were overloaded with submissions! There were so many different interpretations of what the #SignOfTheTimes could physically represent… a lot of them were cars!

#SignOfTheTimes

Obviously we started from the bottom and…

#Sinal dos tempos

Now we’re here.

Not so long ago...

Automobiles really do have an elegant way of showing how much time has gone by, whether that’s good or bad. For more #SignOfTheTime photos, check out our gallery! If you want your photo to have the chance to be featured on the blog or gallery, be sure to submit them to our Flickr Friday group by Thursday afternoon of every week! Winners are announced every Friday!

 

May 23 2018

17:45

Ocean Motion Photography

Enric’s obsession with the sea has always been present. Though his job as a motionographer, focusing on the art of motion design, has taken him many different places, his favorite place to be is always his home island. The majority of his photographs are taken at this location because of his familiarity with the coast. Scouring the shores for the best shots or taking his father’s boat out onto sea is how he manages to capture these stunning, natural shots.

Freediving in the Mediterranean Sea

Something you may not expect upon first glance at his work is that Enric goes very light on his camera equipment. He doesn’t like flashy new lenses and rarely carries more than one body. He is comfortable with his Canon 5D Mark II and a simple 16-35mm. Always being in the ocean requires his equipment to be light and versatile. This is only ever a small hindrance to his ability, as his technical knowledge of photography isn’t extensive and this type of equipment doesn’t often force him to challenge himself.

MOUSTACHE

What Enric despises most about the ocean is it’s ridiculously cold temperature. He tries to “travel to warmer waters during the winter in the Mediterranean Sea.” During cold seasons, there’s nothing he can do but stay out of the water, as much as it pains him. If he could give his younger self any piece of advice, it would be to live closer to the ocean and swim in it “as much as possible.” Something most people would never have guessed is that 95% of his photography comes from free diving, as opposed to diving with gear, so he isn’t capable of staying underwater for very long. This added pressure to his photography brings a real sense of urgency because everything is indeed taken at the moment.

Last days in the Mediterranean Sea

The photo below is Enric’s personal favorite. He remembers swimming when he was about six years old while wearing a mask when suddenly some massive vessel appeared before him. He said it was comparable to a whale encounter because of its grandiose size. That “feeling and vision” has and will always be present in his mind and this photo is a reminder. 

Zeppelin

A typical shooting day requires about 8 hours in and out of the ocean and around 2 hours at the computer editing. This is the ratio Enric hopes to keep going forward in his work, allocating all the daylight he can to shooting and using minimal editing time.

Dolphins in the Red Sea

Where he uploads his photos will also remain constant, as Flickr has and will always be his go-to. “Flickr was that first social media tool that I used as a photographer. This is the first reason that I keep using it.” The other reason is that of Flickr’s atmosphere. The community of photographers has inspired and taught him how to be better in numerous technical aspects.

Last days in the Mediterranean Sea

His profile is definitely worth checking out. If you’re located in Shanghai, Enric will be hosting an exhibition of his work this year that you can see in person! The dates are still in the works but stay tuned on his Flickr and personal website for up to date information!

May 21 2018

19:17

Flickr Heroes of the Week

Second to last Monday of May… we’re not really sure why time is going by so fast lately, but let’s go with it. Here are our heroes: ‘Wet’ by Steve McKenzie on Tumblr and Twitter & ‘Ako castle, Japan’ by S. Ken on Facebook and Google+.

Wet Ako castle, Japan

Interested in having your photo featured as a cover image on our social media pages? Join the Flickr Heroes group!

The Honorable Mentions for the week are below:

Red fox kit Untitled Back yard Brown Hare

If you want your photo to be considered for next week, submit your best images to the Flickr Heroes group pool by Monday morning. Winners are announced in the Flickr Heroes Group, on the blog, and across our social media accounts. Check them out before they change next Monday!

Flickr on Facebook

Flickr on Twitter

Flickr on Tumblr

Flickr on Instagram

Flickr on Google+

May 19 2018

15:00

The Cinematic Images of Jordan Kines

Jordan was kind enough to join Flickr for an interview, which we think you will enjoy.

The Moment Passion Struck:

I always enjoyed taking pictures. Seventh grade was a dark time for me. I was bullied excessively for my femininity, and I did not know how to handle it. I did not know what bullying was. So sadly, I was depressed and felt like my life meant nothing. It wasn’t until Christmas time in seventh grade that I watched this movie called This Christmas, which starred Chris Brown. His character in the film was a photographer, and throughout the movie, he took photographs of the family during the coming days of Christmas. He was always behind the camera, and by Christmas, he made a photo book and gifted one to every family member. I remember telling my mother, “Mommy I want to be like Chris Brown! Can I get a camera for Christmas?! I want to make a photo book too!”

When I got that camera and delved into photography, I felt like I had a purpose. It became an outlet that allowed me to escape the bullying at school. My passion for photography and movie-going coexisted, and I never knew the correlation between the two. When I learned that photography is a derivative of filmmaking, I began to imagine what my still photos would look like in motion picture form. This is also how I arrived at filmmaking.

The Place To Be:

I often need a constant change of pace and direction. My desire for adventure and exploration rarely leaves me in one spot for too long! I am so much more aware when I experience unfamiliar places because it allows me to expand my comfort zone, which is why I love traveling. The best place that I have been so far is Iceland! Wow. Iceland is indeed a land of magic and a beacon of nature’s greatness.

Untitled

Models:

As funny as it may sound, all the models that are seen in my images are my friends, colleagues, clients, and classmates! I tend to photograph my friends when we hang out together and thankfully, those photo results lead to client work. Because I shoot so often with friends and classmates from school, you can see them reoccurring on my Flickr photostream.

Favorite photo:

One of my favorite images of all time that I’ve captured is Parade of Champions. I am not an athletic person. However, I am still able to join in celebrating the Patriots whenever they succeed. The New England Patriots have entertained countless millions of viewers at the Super Bowl for the last decade. It can be argued that they have made the Super Bowl the massive spectacle that it is. At the Super Bowl 2017, Tom Brady led the Patriots to one of the most historic comebacks wins ever. This photograph captures the essence of Boston and how forceful we are as a city. It was exhilarating to photograph a historic triumph in a renowned city from a unique vantage point. Boston Strong.

Parade of champions.

Aerial shots:

Air Kines is a brand name that I created to distinguish and market my aerial photography. It is a hashtag that I use on Instagram to house all of my aerial images. My aerial photographs are conceived with the help of both helicopters and drones. I first dabbled in aerial photography on my 21st birthday in 2015. I flew over Boston, and it was breathtaking. In the following year, spring 2016, along with three other filmmaking friends – I went up again. We made an aerial film, which can be seen here.

Breathe || Above Boston 4k from Farallon on Vimeo.

This film went viral and was featured on major Boston hubs and the news. At this moment, I realized how powerful we are and how viable Air Kines can be. I continued at it and invested in a drone. The progression of drones has allowed for aspiring aerial photographers and cinematographers to capture imagery without breaking the bank (because helicopter flights are incredibly pricey). Drones have permitted for creatives to explore more compelling perspectives and have shifted the art form of aerial imagery. With this advancement in technology, photographers now have access to experiment with aerial photography. Drones can only be an invasion of privacy if the operator doesn’t abide by FAA laws or doesn’t get permission to fly over private properties or occasions. There are nuances between helicopters and drones, but despite that, both methods can be celebrated for their contributions to the advancement of aerial photography and cinematography.

Untitled

Biggest Weakness:

My biggest weakness as a photographer comes from within – my impatience. I tend to rush a lot and try to get to locations to capture an image in a particular lighting situation. My mind is always occupied with the next shot before I’ve captured the one I am framing (this tends to happen in my directing and cinematography as well). I often find that I need to slow down and focus on being present and let things come to me. I discovered that there is so much beauty in spontaneity and making unforeseen images. By slowing down, being patient, and present I can emotionally connect with my subjects.

Untitled

Giving Younger Self Advice:

If I could give my younger self any piece of advice, it would be to go for it and not ask permission. When I first started out in photography, I thought I needed permission and to be surrounded by other photographers to create what I wanted. I wore my desperation like a smelly coat. It wasn’t until I started taking the initiative that I realized it was my responsibility to self-generate work and share it with the world.

Why Flickr:

Flickr was the very first photography platform that I was introduced to and signed up for. Of all of the photo-sharing platforms that I use or have used, Flickr has been the most consistent and true to itself. Flickr has maintained its identity while also putting the needs of photographers first. I love that my image quality is not compromised upon uploading. I enjoyed and still do enjoy Flickr because of how intuitive the site is and how I can navigate smoothly. I can organize my photos into albums nicely. Also, the warm, inviting community. Comments from other users, informative forum discussions, and the influx of inspirational photos – these are all reasons why I love Flickr. I learned a lot about the craft and my work just from these interactions. And the best thing is – I made lots of friends there who became close friends in the real world. Flickr has stood the test of time and will continue to because of its particular combination that caters to its Flickr members and the photographic community at large.

Untitled

Greatest Fear in Photography:

My biggest fear about being apart of the photographic community in this age is not fully being noticed or recognized. With the progression of technology and mobile phones, it seems as though anyone can be a photographer. Our phones have sophisticated camera systems. Which, contributes to the influx of so many images and new people who are interested in photography. The line that separates photographers from people who aren’t has been blurred. It is so great to see new people who are inspired by this art form and want to get involved. However, at times it is often challenging to identify those are genuinely passionate about the craft and have the photographic ability.

Future:

I hope that one day I will be blessed enough to witness my work being displayed in an exhibition. In the meantime, I would like to extend a thank you to the incredible Flickr Staff for giving me the opportunity to be apart of this series along with other talented members of the Flickr community. I look forward to learning about other artists and discovering their work.

Untitled

Be sure to visit Jordan’s Flickr photostream to see more of his work.

May 18 2018

22:26

Flickr Friday – Rush

We made it, Flickr fam. Happy Friday! It came by so fast considering everyone was in a #Rush with this week’s theme. Let’s find out our winners this lovely Friday!

rush

We loved all the detail in what seems like such an ordinary photo. It’s giving us a truly nostalgic vibe.

Rush , Busy Bee 🐝

This one was was titled “Rush, Busy Bee” and it couldn’t fit the theme more perfectly. Super accurate, super gross up close.

Don’t Stop 'Til You Get Enough

For more #Rush photos, check out our gallery! If you want your photo to have the chance to be featured on the blog or gallery, be sure to submit them to our Flickr Friday group by Thursday afternoon of every week! Winners are announced every Friday!

May 14 2018

19:53

Flickr Heroes of the Week

Happy Monday everyone! We hope your celebration of Mother’s Day carries on through today! The new Flickr Heroes of the Week are ‘Brienzergrat’ by Niels Oberson on Tumblr and Twitter & ‘Bough’ by Berk Kır on Facebook and Google+.

Brienzergrat Bough

Interested in having your photo featured as a cover image on our social media pages? Join the Flickr Heroes group!

The Honorable Mentions for the week are below:

Sentir intenso Kitten takes a nap Different sunset and so happy about warm, sunny days.

If you want your photo to be considered for next week, submit your best images to the Flickr Heroes group pool by Monday morning. Winners are announced in the Flickr Heroes Group, on the blog, and across our social media accounts. Check them out before they change next Monday!

Flickr on Facebook

Flickr on Twitter

Flickr on Tumblr

Flickr on Instagram

Flickr on Google+

May 11 2018

15:10

Flickr Friday – Say Cheese

It was obvious how much fun you guys had with this week’s theme! Or was it all just fake smiling… has it all been a lie? This #SayCheese topic makes it extremely hard to tell, but we’ll err on the side of genuine happiness.

NIQA Say Cheese

Well the majority of people were happy…This guy above looks a little blue. We’d be sad too if our favorite cheese turned deadly.

OMG! Is That A 2 For 1 Offer On Nuts Over There

How they got this picture is beyond us, but we’re loving it anyway. Keep the cute coming!

If you’re wanting more #SayCheese photos, check out our gallery! If you want your photo to have the chance to be featured on the blog or gallery, be sure to submit them to our Flickr Friday group by Thursday afternoon of every week! Winners are announced every Friday!

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